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Civil Appeals Archives

Appealing a civil court decision or judgement in Oregon

Oregon litigants may appeal a decision made by a civil court judge or a judgement returned by a civil court jury. However, an appeal is not a second chance to argue their case, and they must be able to show that an error was made in applying the law for their appeal to be successful. The appeals process begins when attorneys file written arguments with the court called appellate briefs. After these written arguments have been reviewed, the attorneys may be asked to make oral arguments.

An overview of civil cases

An Oregon resident who is faced with or considering civil litigation might wonder about the process. A civil case begins as an individual with a complaint files the appropriate paperwork with the court. This is followed by the serving of a copy of the complaint upon the defendant. The complaint provides a summary of the issue in question, describing the defendant's role in causing the injury or dispute in question. The complaint also requests that the court order relief in the case, which may take various forms, including monetary or legal declarations of rights.

Appealing federal trial court decisions

As many Oregon residents know, the outcome of a civil case brought in federal court may be appealed by asking an appellate court to reverse or modify the lower court's decision. Either side may file an appeal in a civil case. The appellate court may also be asked to review decisions made by administrative agencies such as the Social Security Administration and bankruptcy courts.

Trade secrets and non-competition agreements

As many businesses may know, a venture's competitive edge may rely on information that is protected from competitors. Many of these policies and procedures are designated as trade secrets, and some businesses ask that employees sign non-compete agreements in order to provide these secrets with added protection.

What are civil trials and civil appeals?

Readers who have been following our blog have likely heard the terms trial and appeal in some of the posts. For readers who are browsing through posts and those who find themselves in facing circumstances similar to those they read, knowing how an appeal differs from a trial might make understanding what is going on a lot easier.

Oregon Department of State Lands denies Ambre Energy plan

Protecting the interests of the environment is something that some conscionable citizens and government authorities take responsibility for. When these individuals take steps that corporations or other individuals don't particularly like, court battles can start. Civil cases and civil appeals for these environmental cases sometimes occur. One case regarding Ambre Energy seems like it might be heading toward an appeal.

Lowe's drops property tax valuation appeal in Oregon

For a person who owns a business, making sure that property tax valuations are correct is a serious concern. If the valuation is too high, you might end up paying more than what you should have to pay. If it is too low, you won't pay enough. For Lowe's, a property tax valuation issue has been an ongoing fight with one county assessor's office since February of 2013, when the company filed an appeal with the Board of Property Tax Appeals.

Appeals court gives back pay to Oregon firefighters

The labor commission in Oregon previously determined that firefighters who are from Grants Pass needed to be given at least $100,000 -- initial reports indicate that the number is higher than $100,000, though the true total was not given -- for back pay. This stemmed from a 2011 inquiry by Local 3564.

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